Invasive Weeds

Invasive weeds are non-native plants. These weeds displace native vegetation that wildlife depends on. They also harbor pests, reduce crop yields, and increase soil erosion, fire danger, and flood risks. Californians spend $85 million a year on invasive weed management.

The following highly flammable invasive plants should be removed if possible.

Avoid or Remove

French broom (Genista monspessulana)

French broom (Genista monspessulana)

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare)

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare)

Giant reed (Arundo donax)

Giant reed (Arundo donax)

Pampasgrass (Cortaderia spp.)

Pampasgrass (Cortaderia spp.)

Himalayan blackberry (Rubus armeniacus), (but please do not remove blackberry bushes during Spring, as it is used by birds for nesting).

Himalayan blackberry (Rubus armeniacus),
(but please do not remove blackberry bushes during Spring, as it is used by birds for nesting).

 

Scotch and Spanish broom (Cytisus spp.).

Avoid the following non-native invasive weeds that have appeared in some firescaping recommendations.

Periwinkle (Vinca major) This plant invades riparian areas and streambanks, displacing native vegetation but having poor soil retention properties. The resulting erosion and sediment damage fish habitat.

Periwinkle (Vinca major)
This plant invades riparian areas and streambanks,
displacing native vegetation but having poor soil
retention properties. The resulting erosion and
sediment damage fish habitat.

English and Algerian ivy (Hedera spp.) These plants are dispersed into natural areas by birds that eat the berries. They can kill trees, as well as damage buildings and other structures.

English and Algerian ivy (Hedera spp.)
These plants are dispersed into natural areas by birds that eat the berries. They can kill trees, as well as damage buildings and other structures.

Saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) These trees invade riparian areas and use large amounts ofwater while providing little benefit to wildlife.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Only French Broom is pictured.
Scotch and Spanish Broom look very simular to the French
Algerian Ivy, not pictured, looks very much like English Ivy